From The Neolithic To The Sea: A Journey From The Past To The Present
Bakewell Castle
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County
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Condition
Age
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Castle
Derbyshire
53°12′56.88″N, 1°40′13.84″W
SK2199968831
Earthworks
12th Century
Free
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Bakewell Castle is a ruined motte and bailey castle located on the edge of Bakewell, Derbyshire.

It was built in the 12th century, possibly in King Stephens reign. It was constructed in wood and is thought to only be intermittently occupied.

The castle is an example of a small motte and bailey castle which has been partially excavated in 1969-1971, which provided valuable evidence of its construction. The motte was constructed in a series of layers comprising sand, rubble, clay and loam, and that the inner face of the ditch was revetted with limestone boulders. It retains substantial areas of intact archaeological deposits which will include the buried remains of buildings throughout the bailey and on the motte.

The level bailey, which would have been the site of a variety of domestic and ancillary buildings in addition to pens for cattle and horses, is also defined by a scarp which may, originally, have been surrounded by a timber palisade.

The precise history of the castle is unknown, but it may have been built by Ralf Gernon who was granted the previously royal manor of Bakewell by Richard I in the last decade of the 12th century. The stable at the south end of the site is excluded from the scheduling, although the ground beneath it is included.

It was razed to the ground during the English Civil War, and now only the earthworks remain. It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.