From The Neolithic To The Sea: A Journey From The Past To The Present
Holy Trinity Parish Church
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Derbyshire
53° 13′ 25.93″ N, 1° 42′ 35.27″ W
SK1937269717
-
1205
Free
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The Holy Trinity Parish Church is located in Ashford, Derbyshire.

The church has stood on the site since 1205, although it is thought to have replaced an earlier wooden church. It was rebuilt between 1868 and 1870 by J.M. and H. Taylor. The oldest part of the church is its Norman tower, which holds seven bells.

A rood-screen and loft once separated the chancel from the nave, but this was later removed. Parts of the arch between the chancel and the organ chamber are late 16th century.

The organ is a modern two-manual instrument. It was rebuilt from an older organ by Adkins of Derby in 1925, repaired and rebuilt in 1966 by Henry Willis & Sons Ltd, who added an extra stop and then repaired and rebuilt again in 1983 when two further stops were added.
 
The wooden cross in the church was made from charred beams which survived the fire in York Minster’s south transept in 1984. The base shows the original shape of the beams and traces of medieval paint can still be seen.
 
The altar came from Heanor Parish Church. It replaced the one that now stands by the door of the church.
 
The main pathway through the churchyard is flanked on both sides by yew trees. These are thought to be 500-600 years old.