From The Neolithic To The Sea: A Journey From The Past To The Present

Old House Museum

Statistics
Category
County
Coordinates
Grid
Condition
Age
Admission
Museum
Derbyshire
53° 12′ 48.6″ N 1° 40′ 47.28″ W
SK2138068572
Good
1534
£
Map


  • History
  • Gallery
  • Gallery
Old House Museum is a typical Tudor dwelling, a 16th century yeoman's house that now houses a small museum, located in Bakewell, Derbyshire.

The house was built in 1534, of vernacular construction, during the reign of Henry VIII. Ralph Gell of Hopton, near Wirksworth, had taken over the collection of tithes, the tenth of all produce that was due to the church, and needed a house for his steward, Christopher Plant.

It was extended in 1549, reflecting the growing prosperity from the tithe collecting,so made much bigger and converted into a gentleman's residence during the reign of Elizabeth I, with the added luxury of an internal toilet. In central room a large fireplace was constructed, this would have been where majority of the cooking was done.

In 1777 Richard Arkwright, divided the old house into five cottages for the workers at the mill. These provided adequate accommodation for the time, but by the 1950s the cottages were condemned unfit for human habitation. Scheduled for demolition, the house was saved by the Bakewell & District Historical Society who then converted the house to the museum.