From The Neolithic To The Sea: A Journey From The Past To The Present

Rowsley Sidings

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County
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Condition
Age
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Derbyshire
53°10'59.8"N 1°36'43.1"W
SK 2602365210
Demolished
1877
Free
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Rowsley Sidings was a Marshalling Yard owned by Midland Railway located on the south side of Rowsley, Derbyshire.

The sidings were planed in 1873, for a strip of land beside the A6 road and the River Derwent to be used. Although these plans called for a huge area of land, but this had to be reduced, as Sir Joseph Whitworth, the owner of Stancliffe Hall and adjacent gritstone quarries, objected to selling his land.

Rowsley Sidings were opened on 19th March 1877, together with the goods lines that ran between separate Up and Down Sidings, often referred to in the early years as North and South Sidings.

The Up Sidings, which were at a slightly lower level for part of their length, consisted of 12 roads and could be shunted from the Up goods line and from both ends. The Down Sidings had 15 roads and could be shunted from the Down goods line, and at the northern end. A signal box was situated in each group of sidings.

In July 1927, the Chief General Superintendent of the London Midland & Scottish Railway reported that the Down Sidings were inadequate for the traffic using them. Seven additional sidings were built by September 1928. This new layout required two signal boxes. Although it was officially named the 2nd Down Goods, it was known locally as the Coal Road, as that was what it was mainly used for.

In 1963, the Beeching studies were carried out on what were considered to be duplicate routes, one of which was the line from Derby to Manchester. One recommendation was that the line should be closed between Matlock and Peak Forest Junction following the completion of the Euston to Manchester Piccadilly electrification, this was done in stages.

The Sidings officially closed on 23rd April 1964, although the siding were used for storage until late 1966. Today the only evidence for much of the sidings are concrete footings and odd bricks, although Peak Rail still use the very southern end.