From The Neolithic To The Sea: A Journey From The Past To The Present

Cheshire



Coat of Arms
Macclesfield Forest



Cheshire is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside and Greater Manchester to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south and Flintshire, Wales and Wrexham county borough to the west.

The county covers 905 square miles and has a population of around 1 million. It is mostly rural, with a number of small towns and villages supporting the agricultural industries which produce Cheshire cheese, salt, chemicals and silk.

Prehistoric burial grounds have been discovered at The Bridestones near Congleton and Robin Hood's Tump near Alpraham. The remains of Iron Age hill forts are found on sandstone ridges at several locations in Cheshire. Examples include Maiden Castle on Bickerton Hill, Helsby Hillfort and Woodhouse Hillfort at Frodsham. The Roman fortress and walls of Chester, perhaps the earliest building works in Cheshire remaining above ground, are constructed from purple-grey sandstone.

Many surviving buildings from the 15th to 17th centuries are timbered, particularly in the southern part of the county. Notable examples include the moated manor house Little Moreton Hall, dating from around 1450, and many commercial and residential buildings in Chester, Nantwich and surrounding villages.